Modern British Farce: A Selective Study of British Farce by Leslie Smith

By Leslie Smith

A research of the preferred glossy dramatists and the continuity of the farce culture from Pinero to Travers, the Whitehall staff and Orton which examines and questions many of the universal assumptions approximately its nature. Farce options are proven to be more and more utilized in severe drama.

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Modern British Farce: A Selective Study of British Farce from Pinero to the Present Day

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As the Act progresses, the smell of the stables increasingly invades the Deanery, and Pinero gradually makes us aware of a certain fearful fascination that gambling on the horses begins to exercise not only on the daugh- A. W. Pinero and the Court Farces 41 ters (who persuade Georgiana at the end of the Act to place a bet on Dandy Dick) but also on the Dean. Here, as with Posket in The Magistrate, is a man settled into his official role, but tempted by the natural man beneath. We see in Act I a self-esteem and concern with his dignity that positively invite catastrophe; and we are also made aware through Sir Tristram's memories of the Dean's student days of his earlier passion for gambling.

AGATHA. My child is, and always was - perfect LUKYN. You misunderstand me! I was his godfather, I gave him a silver cup. AGATHA. Oh, do excuse me (puts handkerchief to her eyes). How did I become acquainted with such a vulgar expression. I don't know where I pick up my slang. It must be through loitering at shop windows. LUKYN rises Oh, oh, oh! LUKYN. Pray compose yourself. I'll leave you for a moment. Goes to window. L. and up C. AGATHA. (across table to Charlotte). How shall I begin, Charley?

I'm afraid you've come to tell me Posket is ill? AGATHA (surprised). I- no- my husband is at home There is a sharp gust of wind heard with the rain. Lukyn starts. LUKYN. Lord forgive me! I've killed him AGATHA (with horror). Colonel Lukyn! LUKYN (confused). Madam! AGATHA. Indeed, Mr Posket is at home. ). Is he? I wish we all were ... AGATHA (tenderly). You were at my little boy's christening? LUKYN (with his thoughts elsewhere). Yes- yes- certainly. AGATHA. You remember what a fine little fellow he was.

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