Polynesian Cultures in Perspective by Claire O'Neal

By Claire O'Neal

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Peter Bellwood, The Polynesians: Prehistory of an Island People (London: Thames and Hudson, 1978), p. 14. 2. Rowan McKinnon, et. , South Pacific (Footscray, Australia: Lonely Planet, 2009), p. 36. 3. Richard Alleyne, Telegraph, “Kon-Tiki Explorer Was Partly Right—Polynesians Had South American Roots,” June 17, 2011. html Chapter 3: Haole: Outsiders Come to Paradise 1. Matt K. Matsuda, Pacific Worlds: A History of Seas, Peoples, and Cultures (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012), p. 67.

Copra (KOP-ruh)—the white “meat” which is found inside a coconut. cyclone (SAHY-klohn)—a large, often destructive storm with high-speed winds which move in a circular motion; cyclones occur in the southern Pacific. lei (LEY)—a string of flowers worn around the neck or on the head. missionary (MISH-uh-ner-ee)—a person who travels in order to bring his or her religion to new communities. mutiny (MYOOT-in-ee)—a rebellion against a leader, especially on a ship. outrigger canoe (OWT-rig-er kuh-NOO)—a canoe with a supporting float for added stability.

3 This luxurious feather ‘ahu‘ula cloak may have once belonged to Hawaii’s Chief Kalani‘opu‘u (1729–1782). indd 49 8/6/14 12:37 PM Chapter Six For nearly three thousand years, tapa cloth has been an essential part of Polynesian life. Tapa can be used to make nearly anything, from loincloths for men or wrap skirts for women to sails for a canoe. Tapa cloth is made from the inner bark of the paper mulberry tree. Even today, women carry on the tradition of sitting together and talking while beating the bark with wooden mallets.

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