Reason and Violence: A Decade of Sartre's Philosophy by R. D.; Cooper, D. G. Laing

By R. D.; Cooper, D. G. Laing

This paintings is obtainable by itself or as a part of the 7 quantity set chosen Works of R. D. Laing

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By contrast, Mannoni suggests that the European culture tends towards what he calls ‘inferiority’. This might at first appear to be a rather unexpected claim, but we must bear in mind that Mannoni wanted to create an accurate portrait of the pathology that he detected in the colonizers and the colonized. He argues that those Europeans who do become colonials are not created through their colonial experience. That is, they do not become colonial simply by virtue of having taken up residence and work in a colonial setting.

The Fanonian Psychoanalytic 21 Anderson puts the matter precisely: ‘It was a question of how white males might civilize the tropics (resident or distanced), and whether that region deserved their best efforts—they remained the only possible agents of civilization. Colonial optimism always won out over colonial pessimism’ (1367). Indeed, in place of the old justifications for colonial rule such as moral or physiological superiority, the Berkeley-Hills of the world could point to the psychological superiority of the European.

The Fanonian Psychoanalytic 21 Anderson puts the matter precisely: ‘It was a question of how white males might civilize the tropics (resident or distanced), and whether that region deserved their best efforts—they remained the only possible agents of civilization. Colonial optimism always won out over colonial pessimism’ (1367). Indeed, in place of the old justifications for colonial rule such as moral or physiological superiority, the Berkeley-Hills of the world could point to the psychological superiority of the European.

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